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Patricia Plays a Part Mabel Barnes-Grundy

Patricia Plays a Part

Mabel Barnes-Grundy

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230320236
Paperback
98 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER II PATRICIAMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER II PATRICIA ROUTS THE ENEMY BUT she tired them out. They began to dread the very sound of her footstep. There was no peace in the, up to now, pleasant house. No rest. It would weary the reader to recapitulate all their arguments of the following days, to cover the ground of their line of attack and defence, to mention the number of times Mrs. Moffat and Mary referred to Patricias age and attractiveness and general ignorance of the ways of the world. Their veiled hints as to the men who were prowling about the face of Europe ready to devour the first luckless young female who crossed their path. Of the number of diseases to be contracted on the Continent, from Roman fever to Riviera sore throat- of the earthquakes, mosquitoes, and other plagues she would be likely to encounter- of the insults she would receive from every person of every class, from the moment she set foot on any soil that was not British- of the number of times her pocket would be picked--and this to Patricia appeared the most feeble of all their arguments, for did they not know she never possessed a pocket- for what girl who considered her appearance and outline in these days of attenuated slimness did? Of the scandal and talk she would create in the neighbourhood. Why, Aunt John already felt faint at the very thought of what Mrs. Wilmot of Shaw Hall, and the Misses Ponsonby of the Holt, and the Honourable Mrs. De Moleyns of the Manor House, and Lady Elwick of Elwick Coombe would say. Indeed, she shuddered. And Patricia was obliged to soothe her with little pats on the back and eau-de-Cologne held to her nose. Then Aunt John sickened with influenza. She had been weakened, she said, by Patricias talk. The influenza microbe had been in the air ready to pounce...